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Vero Method

Principles and practices for customer relationship management

At Vero, we believe the way software integrates with customer and user data is changing. We're pushing toward this future.

Below are some of the core ideas that Vero is built on.

01

Principles

No data storage

CRM software should access and use user data at its source. Syncing, copying and storing data is inefficient, expensive and prone to error. By accessing centralised data stores owned and controlled by the customer, CRM software encourages a positive data flywheel.

Building blocks, not monolithic solutions

CRM software should do its specific job well without extra configuration but should be extensible: connecting with and extending business’ own solutions. All software products are ultimately “internal tools”: the businesses of today demand interoperable solutions rather than off-the-shelf monolithic software suites.

Maintenance matters

Making it easy to create messages and automations isn’t enough: processes need to be easy to maintain over time. The best solutions are both efficient to setup and easy to maintain over the long term.

Simple first, then powerful

Tools should be simple for individual users to get started with then grow with those users over time.

Aim for clarity

Don’t invent terms where possible. New terms typically have different meanings for different teams. For example, "newsletters" should be called newsletters.

Convention over configuration

Whilst interoperability is important, it's critical to ensure a great experience by default. Encourage useful, favourable behaviours by limiting configuration wherever possible.

02

Practices

Send updates: keep your users informed

Giving your users all of the information they need to make decisions builds trust. Transparency is key. Share your achievements, your plans, your vision.

Respect peoples' privacy

Privacy is paramount. Respect your users' data and choices. Don’t make it hard.

Know when to automate, and when not to

Editorial will always matter. Certain content benefits from automation and algorithmic selection and certain content doesn’t. Know the difference and select the right approach for the job.

Marketing operations as a center of excellence

The marketing operations teams of old were brought in to clean up processes that had fractured at scale. Marketing Operations of the future is a first-class citizen, brought in early to make sound, scalable decisions that help businesses achieve their growth goals.

Do the basics well first, then increase complexity

It’s easy to get caught up in the possible at the expense of moving forward today. Doing the basics really well will set you up for success and is appreciated by customers. Don’t over-engineer things until you have no choice.